Apr
19

Warton Old Rectory

Warton Old Rectory is a rare surviving example of a large medieval stone dwelling house. It was not only a home for the rector of the local church, which was founded in the 12th century or earlier, but was also a manor where courts were held. It became one of the wealthiest rectories in the diocese of York.

By the end of the 12th century patronage determining the appointment of priests to the position of rector was held by Marmaduke de Thweng. Two of his younger sons, both priests, inherited his property when their elder brother died childless; they were probably responsible for building the rectory in the early 14th century. Control of the appointment of rectors was contested between the de Thweng family and the monarch, as Duke of Lancaster, until the 16th century.

Unlike monastic houses the rectory was not directly affected by the Suppression of the Monasteries in the 16th century. It was nevertheless abandoned at an unknown date and is known to have been a ruin by 1721.

The north end of the building was occupied as a cottage until well into the twentieth century, while the site of the medieval hall was roofless. After the site came into the guardianship of the state in 1971 later additions to the rectory were removed, leaving only the medieval parts visible.

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Warton Old Priory

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Warton Old Priory

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Warton Old Priory

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Warton Old Priory

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Warton Old Priory

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Warton Old Priory

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